--> Flag Counter Egalitarian Bookworm Cannabis Religious Tolerance PLUR Atheist No Hate United States PRIDE Taoist End the terror war
August 27, 2014

anarchei: Don’t Vote
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anarchei: Don’t Vote

Got a suggestion from eltigrechico for this sticker.

Buy: Stickers | Throw Pillows | Tote Bags


August 27, 2014
Cosplayers Fight for Online Anonymity and Privacy During Dragon Con

priceofliberty

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), sci-fi blog io9, and a coalition of fan communities are launching “Project Secret Identity,” a cosplay photo campaign to raise awareness of the importance of anonymity and privacy during the annual pop culture convention Dragon Con in Atlanta, Georgia, Aug. 29-Sept. 1. The campaign, online at ProjectSecretIdentity.org, is supported by a cross-fandom coalition of organizations, including: Southeastern Browncoats, a Firefly-inspired non-profit; the Harry Potter Alliance, an activism organization; the Baker Street Babes, a Sherlock Holmes fan group and podcast; Wattpad, a community of readers and writers; and the Organization for Transformative Works, a fan-culture advocacy organization. "Whether it’s the ‘Eye of Sauron’ in The Lord of the Rings or ‘The Machine’ in Person of Interest, genre culture has long explored and criticized mass surveillance,” said EFF Investigative Researcher Dave Maass. “The last year’s worth of stories about the NSA have read too much like dystopian fiction. In response, we need to focus the imaginations of fans to advocate for a future where free expression is protected through privacy and anonymity.“ During the campaign, cosplayers around the world can use ProjectSecretIdentity.org to post photos of themselves in costume bearing pro-anonymity slogans, such as “I Have the Right to a Secret Identity” and “Privacy is Not a Fantasy.” Dragon Con attendees can also stop by the Project Secret Identity photo stations at EFF’s table (second floor at the Hilton Atlanta) and the Southeastern Browncoats’ booth (#1000 at AmericasMart). ”In J.K. Rowling’s novels, Voldemort came to power not only through coercion, but by monitoring, controlling, and censoring the Wizarding World’s lines of communication,” Harry Potter Alliance Executive Director Paul DeGeorge said. "In the real world, there is no charm-protected room where we can meet and organize in secret. What we have is the Internet and we need to fight to keep it free and secure." "Freedom from oppressive governments is central to the ethos of the Firefly fandom,” said Serenity Richards, captain of the Southeastern Browncoats. “By standing up for anonymity today, we can prevent ‘The Alliance’ from becoming a reality in the future.” The activism campaign coincides with Dragon Con’s Electronic Frontiers Forum, a track of panels on the intersection of technology with free speech and privacy. EFF Deputy General Counsel Kurt Opsahl will present an update to his acclaimed presentation, Through a PRISM, Darkly: Everything we know about NSA spying,” which debuted at the Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg, Germany in December 2013. Opsahl and Maass will also speak on a number of discussion panels, covering issues ranging from police searches of cell phones to the Freedom of Information Act.

August 27, 2014

thelandofmaps: Syria - Refugee situation and internal displacement 27 august 2014.

thelandofmaps: Syria - Refugee situation and internal displacement 27 august 2014.

August 27, 2014

america-wakiewakie: Drought Leaves 100s Of Central CA Homes With No Tap Water | CBS San Francisco 
Government officials and community groups say hundreds of rural San Joaquin Valley residents no longer can get drinking water from their home faucets because California’s extreme drought has dried up their individual wells. The situation has become so dire that the Tulare County Office of Emergency Services had 12-gallon-per person rations of bottled water delivered on Friday in the community of East Porterville, where at least 182 of the 1,400 households reported having no or not enough water. The office’s manager, Andrew Lockman, says the supplies cost the county $30,000 and were designed to last about three weeks, but are only a temporary fix. To get future deliveries, officials are asking low-income residents to apply for aid and for bottled water donations like the one a local casino made a few weeks ago.

america-wakiewakieDrought Leaves 100s Of Central CA Homes With No Tap Water | CBS San Francisco 

Government officials and community groups say hundreds of rural San Joaquin Valley residents no longer can get drinking water from their home faucets because California’s extreme drought has dried up their individual wells. The situation has become so dire that the Tulare County Office of Emergency Services had 12-gallon-per person rations of bottled water delivered on Friday in the community of East Porterville, where at least 182 of the 1,400 households reported having no or not enough water. The office’s manager, Andrew Lockman, says the supplies cost the county $30,000 and were designed to last about three weeks, but are only a temporary fix. To get future deliveries, officials are asking low-income residents to apply for aid and for bottled water donations like the one a local casino made a few weeks ago.

1:04pm
  
Filed under: water 
August 27, 2014
Finished reading Rise of the Lich King by Christie Golden.

[Amazon]

Review: I’m more bothered by the “thanks" Arthas gives Ner’Zhul for making him his greatest death knight throughout the entire Scourge, then I am by Golden’s writing capability. It was a fun read, and brought together a strong narrative that held together the life of Arthas - keeping close to the storyline of Reign of Chaos and The Frozen Throne, which made it worthwhile from start to finish. 

August 27, 2014

(Source: diaverik, via rockmynaughtysocks)

August 27, 2014

laliberty: Because nothing says “freedom” like getting a 1/2000000th of a say in choosing who gets to tell you how to live your life. And if voting is truly the reason people (fellow Cubans, in this case) are dying to come here (as opposed to fleeing oppression, searching for greater economic and personal freedoms, greater opportunities for their careers, and brighter futures for their families), then that’s sad, since their votes count just as much here as they do over there..


“Maybe if we bully enough people into voting, we’ll get the turnout we want!”..Well there’s your problem, Juan. 
Maybe if you stopped coercing people against their will, they’d come around as voters eventually to join you. And even if they don’t, you’ve no reason to verbally or physically abuse them until they join you and other local voters.
Voters shouldn’t terrorize non-voters into voting - it’s unethical.

laliberty: Because nothing says “freedom” like getting a 1/2000000th of a say in choosing who gets to tell you how to live your life. And if voting is truly the reason people (fellow Cubans, in this case) are dying to come here (as opposed to fleeing oppression, searching for greater economic and personal freedoms, greater opportunities for their careers, and brighter futures for their families), then that’s sad, since their votes count just as much here as they do over there..

Maybe if we bully enough people into voting, we’ll get the turnout we want!”..Well there’s your problem, Juan. 

Maybe if you stopped coercing people against their will, they’d come around as voters eventually to join you. And even if they don’t, you’ve no reason to verbally or physically abuse them until they join you and other local voters.

Voters shouldn’t terrorize non-voters into voting - it’s unethical.

(via freexcitizen)

August 27, 2014

itsdleon: A mother lost her child. A father lost his son. A young man lost his life. #JusticeForMikeBrown

(via rockmynaughtysocks)

1:22am
  
Filed under: RIP Mike Brown 
August 27, 2014
“Terrorism" and the perpetual emotion war machine by Norman Solomon

April 24, 2013 - As a perpetual emotion machine - producing and guzzling its own political fuel - the “war on terror” continues to normalize itself as a thoroughly American way of life and death. Ongoing warfare has become a matter of default routine, pushed along by mainline media and the leadership of both parties in Washington. Without a clear and effective upsurge of opposition from the grassroots, Americans can expect to remain citizens of a war-driven country for the rest of their lives. Across the United States, many thousands of peeling bumper stickers on the road say: “End this Endless War.” They got mass distribution from MoveOn.org back in 2007, when a Republican was in the White House. Now, a thorough search of the MoveOn website might leave the impression that endless war ended with the end of the George W. Bush presidency. MoveOn is very big as online groups go, but it is symptomatic of a widespread problem among an array of left-leaning organizations that have made their peace with the warfare state. Such silence assists the Obama administration as it makes the“war on terror”even more resolutely bipartisan and further embedded in the nation’s political structures - while doing immense damage to our economy, siphoning off resources that should go to meet human needs, further militarizing society and undermining civil liberties.
Now, on Capitol Hill, the most overt attempt to call a halt to the “war on terror” is coming from Rep. Barbara Lee, whose bill H.R. 198 would revoke the Authorization for Use of Military Force that Congress approved three days after 9/11. Several months since it was introduced, H.R. 198 only has a dozen co-sponsors. Evidently, in Congress, there is sparse support for repealing the September 2001 blanket authorization for war. Instead, there are growing calls for a larger blanket. Bipartisan Washington is warming to the idea that a new congressional resolution may be needed to give War on Terror 2.0 an expansive framework. Even for the law benders and breakers who manage the executive branch’s war machinery, the language of the September 2001 resolution doesn’t seem stretchable enough to cover the U.S. warfare of impunity that’s underway across the globe..with more on the drawing boards. On Tuesday afternoon, when a Senate Judiciary subcommittee held a hearing on “targeted killing,” the proceedings underscored the great extent of bipartisan overlap for common killing ground. Republican super-hawk Sen. Lindsey Graham lauded President Obama for “targeting people in a very commander-in-chief-like way.” And what passed for senatorial criticism took as a given the need for continuing drone strikes. In the words of the subcommittee’s chairman, Sen. Dick Durbin, “More transparency is needed to maintain the support of the American people and the international community” for those attacks.
This is classic tinkering with war machinery. During the first several years of the Vietnam War, very few senators went beyond mild kibitzing about how the war could be better waged. In recent years, during President Obama’s escalation of the war in Afghanistan that tripled the U.S. troop levels in that country, senators like John Kerry (now secretary of state) kept offering their helpful hints for how to fine tune the war effort. The “war on terror” is now engaged in various forms of military intervention in an estimated two-dozen countries, killing and maiming uncounted civilians while creating new enemies. It infuses foreign policy with unhinged messages hidden in plain sight, like a purloined letter proclaiming “What goes around won’t come around” and telling the world “Do as we say, not as we do.” Political ripple effects from the Boston Marathon bombings have only begun. While public opinion hasn’t gotten carried away with fear, much of the news media - television in particular - is stoking the fires of fear but scarcely raising a single question that might challenge the basic assumptions of a forever “war on terror.”
After a city has been traumatized and a country has empathized, a constructive takeaway would be that it’s terribly wrong to set off bombs that kill and maim. But that outlook is a nonstarter the moment it might be applied to victims of U.S. drones and cruise missiles in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere. The message seems to be that Americans should never be bombed but must keep bombing. The death of Richie Havens days ago is a loss and reminder. Each of us has only so many days ahead. We may as well live them with deeper meaning, for peace and social justice.
To hear Havens performing the song “Lives in the Balance” written by another great musician, Jackson Browne, is to be awakened anew:
“I want to know who the men in the shadows are
I want to hear somebody asking them why
They can be counted on to tell us who our enemies are
But they’re never the ones to fight or to die
And there are lives in the balance
There are people under fire
There are children at the cannons
And there is blood on the wire”

[Commondreams]

Terrorism" and the perpetual emotion war machine by Norman Solomon

April 24, 2013 - As a perpetual emotion machine - producing and guzzling its own political fuel - the “war on terror” continues to normalize itself as a thoroughly American way of life and death. Ongoing warfare has become a matter of default routine, pushed along by mainline media and the leadership of both parties in Washington. Without a clear and effective upsurge of opposition from the grassroots, Americans can expect to remain citizens of a war-driven country for the rest of their lives. Across the United States, many thousands of peeling bumper stickers on the road say:End this Endless War.They got mass distribution from MoveOn.org back in 2007, when a Republican was in the White House. Now, a thorough search of the MoveOn website might leave the impression that endless war ended with the end of the George W. Bush presidencyMoveOn is very big as online groups go, but it is symptomatic of a widespread problem among an array of left-leaning organizations that have made their peace with the warfare state. Such silence assists the Obama administration as it makes thewar on terroreven more resolutely bipartisan and further embedded in the nation’s political structures - while doing immense damage to our economy, siphoning off resources that should go to meet human needs, further militarizing society and undermining civil liberties.

Now, on Capitol Hill, the most overt attempt to call a halt to the “war on terror” is coming from Rep. Barbara Lee, whose bill H.R. 198 would revoke the Authorization for Use of Military Force that Congress approved three days after 9/11. Several months since it was introduced, H.R. 198 only has a dozen co-sponsors. Evidently, in Congress, there is sparse support for repealing the September 2001 blanket authorization for war. Instead, there are growing calls for a larger blanket. Bipartisan Washington is warming to the idea that a new congressional resolution may be needed to give War on Terror 2.0 an expansive framework. Even for the law benders and breakers who manage the executive branch’s war machinery, the language of the September 2001 resolution doesn’t seem stretchable enough to cover the U.S. warfare of impunity that’s underway across the globe..with more on the drawing boards. On Tuesday afternoon, when a Senate Judiciary subcommittee held a hearing on “targeted killing,” the proceedings underscored the great extent of bipartisan overlap for common killing ground. Republican super-hawk Sen. Lindsey Graham lauded President Obama for “targeting people in a very commander-in-chief-like way.” And what passed for senatorial criticism took as a given the need for continuing drone strikes. In the words of the subcommittee’s chairman, Sen. Dick Durbin, “More transparency is needed to maintain the support of the American people and the international community” for those attacks.

This is classic tinkering with war machinery. During the first several years of the Vietnam War, very few senators went beyond mild kibitzing about how the war could be better waged. In recent years, during President Obama’s escalation of the war in Afghanistan that tripled the U.S. troop levels in that country, senators like John Kerry (now secretary of state) kept offering their helpful hints for how to fine tune the war effort. Thewar on terroris now engaged in various forms of military intervention in an estimated two-dozen countries, killing and maiming uncounted civilians while creating new enemies. It infuses foreign policy with unhinged messages hidden in plain sight, like a purloined letter proclaiming What goes around won’t come aroundand telling the world Do as we say, not as we do.” Political ripple effects from the Boston Marathon bombings have only begun. While public opinion hasn’t gotten carried away with fear, much of the news media - television in particular - is stoking the fires of fear but scarcely raising a single question that might challenge the basic assumptions of a forever “war on terror.”

After a city has been traumatized and a country has empathized, a constructive takeaway would be that it’s terribly wrong to set off bombs that kill and maim. But that outlook is a nonstarter the moment it might be applied to victims of U.S. drones and cruise missiles in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere. The message seems to be that Americans should never be bombed but must keep bombing. The death of Richie Havens days ago is a loss and reminder. Each of us has only so many days ahead. We may as well live them with deeper meaning, for peace and social justice.

To hear Havens performing the song “Lives in the Balance” written by another great musician, Jackson Browne, is to be awakened anew:

I want to know who the men in the shadows are

I want to hear somebody asking them why

They can be counted on to tell us who our enemies are

But they’re never the ones to fight or to die

And there are lives in the balance

There are people under fire

There are children at the cannons

And there is blood on the wire

[Commondreams]

August 27, 2014
White House weighs options of military strikes on both ISIS and Assad Regime

priceofliberty:

So essentially just indiscriminate bombing of the entire country, then?

..and here I was thinking the whole point of the “war on terror" was to "stop terrorism”, NOT profilerate it via state terror.

Yep, this isn’t Orwellian at all.

(Source: basedheisenberg, via bringiton911)

August 27, 2014

carlboygenius: In West Virginia, archaeologists have recovered evidence of the 1921 Battle of Blair Mountain, which pitted more than 10,000 union coal miners against thousands of law enforcement officers and coal company guards and remains the United States’ largest civil conflict besides the Civil War.
Source: Archaeology Magazine

carlboygenius: In West Virginia, archaeologists have recovered evidence of the 1921 Battle of Blair Mountain, which pitted more than 10,000 union coal miners against thousands of law enforcement officers and coal company guards and remains the United States’ largest civil conflict besides the Civil War.

Source: Archaeology Magazine

August 27, 2014

traumatrae: I don’t find myself unattractive, but I also don’t find myself attractive.

I feel like I’m just sort of here, not something that really grabs anyone’s attention.
Sort of like a chair.
Or maybe a lamp.

image

(via spooky-froll)

August 27, 2014
"And if Michael Brown was not angelic, I was practically demonic. I had my first drink when I was 11. I once brawled in the cafeteria after getting hit in the head with a steel trash can. In my junior year I failed five out of seven classes. By the time I graduated from high school, I had been arrested for assaulting a teacher and been kicked out of school (twice.) And yet no one who knew me thought I had the least bit of thug in me. That is because I also read a lot of books, loved my Commodore 64, and ghostwrote love notes for my friends. In other words, I was a human being. A large number of American teenagers live exactly like Michael Brown. Very few of them are shot in the head and left to bake on the pavement. The “angelic” standard was not one created by the reporter. It was created by a society that cannot face itself, and thus must employ a dubious “morality” to hide its sins. It is reinforced by people who have embraced the notion of “twice as good” while avoiding the circumstances which gave that notion birth. Consider how easily living in a community “with rough patches” becomes part of a list of ostensible sins. Consider how easily “black-on-black crime” becomes not a marker of a shameful legacy of segregation but a moral failing."

— Ta-Nehisi Coates, being amazing. (via politicalprof)

(via america-wakiewakie)

August 27, 2014

antinwo

http://www.kcet.org/living/food/food-rant/monsanto-to-take-over-the-weed-industry.html

http://www.sustainablebusiness.com/index.cfm/go/news.display/id/25441

(via antinwo)

August 26, 2014
How the Brutalized Become Brutal: Chris Hedges

priceofliberty:

The horrific pictures of the beheading of American reporter James Foley, the images of executions of alleged collaborators in Gaza and the bullet-ridden bodies left behind in Iraq by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant are the end of a story, not the beginning. They are the result of years, at times decades, of the random violence, brutal repression and collective humiliation the United States has inflicted on others.

These events don’t happen in a vacuum. None of these people are just waking up one day thinking,you know, I am going to turn to a life of terror. It’s more lucrative and they cover dental.” Children who were young, only 7 or 8 in 2003, are now young adults. Many of them have spent almost their entire lives living in countries ravaged by war and foreign meddlers with self-serving interests. I am neither advocating nor justifying the violent behavior of the few soldiers who feel compelled to lay down their lives in service to a cause. That’s what our own soldiers do, is it not?

I don’t care if our airstrikes wipe Islamic State forces off the face of the earth, we WILL be back at it again a decade from now when uncontrollable, unforeseeable elements of today come back to haunt us. Just as they did when we attempted to topple Assad, just as they did when we toppled Gaddafi, just as they did when we brought regime change to Iraq and Afghanistan.

The War on Terror, like the War on Drugs, is neither a real war nor can it actually be won. If you listened to bin Laden’s speech in 2004, you would realize that al-Qaeda, for all intents and purposes, won on September 11th. Look around you: the economy is teetering on the brink, the U.S. is nearly 20 trillion dollars in debt (half of that from the last decade ALONE, fighting needless wars), our civil liberties are threatened at every corner.

All that we have to do is to send two mujahidin to the furthest point east to raise a piece of cloth on which is written al-Qaida, in order to make the generals race there to cause America to suffer human, economic, and political losses without their achieving for it anything of note other than some benefits for their private companies.

bin Laden’s point was that the United States would forever chase ghosts until its meddlesome and brutal foreign policy became its very downfall. Afghanistan is called “Russia’s Vietnam” by many because it serves as yet another clearcut example of how a foreign occupier cannot ever hope to subdue an awakened and disillusioned populace. Guerilla tactics and asymmetrical warfare are the new black - the USSR went bankrupt fighting the Mujaheddin which led to its collapse, forever tokenized in American hearts & minds as the fall of the Berlin Wall.

This mental “triumph” has deluded millions of Americans, including our rulers, into believing we won’t fail like the ‘Reds’ and that is our biggest mistake. You cannot supply a madman with chemical weapons and then turn around and cry wolf a decade later when he breaks his leash. You cannot facilitate the deaths of thousands of children through embargoes and then feign indignation when the survivors grow up to despise you. You cannot materially supply chaotic, rebellious elements and expect them to stay on their side of an arbitrary line in a massive sandbox.

You cannot have your cake and eat it, too.